To Build A New Family Through Adoption, You May Need To Terminate Someone's Parental Rights

Adoption isn't always easy. What may seem the best course of action for a child's happiness and well-being — adoption by a loving, caring and supportive family — may not be so clear to that child's birth parent. When you're faced with the need to sever ties with a parent that doesn't want to let go, it may be time to terminate their parental rights.

At Billick Family Law, our attorneys understand how sensitive adoption matters can be. We believe that giving our clients the benefits of our legal experience is only part of our job. We also work to treat every North Carolina family we serve with the support and compassion that helps them grow and stay healthy.

When Could A Termination Of Parental Rights Be Necessary?

When you meet someone new, your ex may resist what's in your children's best interests. If your new spouse wants to adopt your kids but their other biological parent drags their heels, then it may be necessary to terminate their parental rights. Most jurisdictions also consider factors like:

  • Parental behaviors such as substance abuse, mental illness or incapacitation
  • Abusive relationships or neglectful living situations
  • Abandonment by parents or parental alienation
  • A mother or father's failure to support or maintain contact with the child

Whether you are a stepparent who wants to provide your spouse's kids with legal ties to your possessions or benefits, or you are a concerned family member who sees that your young relative's parents are harming them, you need a lawyer to help you get what you and the children deserve. No matter what your situation entails, it's important to convince the courts that you're in the right — and having legal representation makes a big difference. Our team has the legal experience you need to argue for your custody rights in court and make a positive difference in a child's development.

Your Child Deserves A Better Life

How can you prove that a termination of parental rights is the best option? The key lies in establishing that it's in the child's best interests. It may be necessary to gather evidence about their living circumstances, their parent's history or their well-being based on assessments by professionals, like psychologists and doctors.

Talking to an attorney could make it easier to manage your case so that it doesn't cause even more of a disruption during already-trying times. Discuss your situation with Billick Family Law today. We're ready to bring our experience and aggressive style of legal advocacy to the courtroom so you can protect those you care about most. Call our Concord office at 704-490-4054 or contact us online for help.